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Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of impacts of linear developments, resource extraction, and industry on the agricultural land base found in the catalog.

impacts of linear developments, resource extraction, and industry on the agricultural land base

Calvin Webb

impacts of linear developments, resource extraction, and industry on the agricultural land base

by Calvin Webb

  • 83 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Environment Council of Alberta in Edmonton, Alta .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Alberta.
    • Subjects:
    • Land use, Rural -- Alberta.,
    • Agriculture -- Economic aspects -- Alberta.,
    • Energy development -- Environmental aspects -- Alberta.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 78-86.

      StatementCalvin Webb.
      ContributionsEnvironment Council of Alberta.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD319.A4 W42 1982
      The Physical Object
      Paginationviii, 87 p. :
      Number of Pages87
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3234722M
      LC Control Number83148307

      spillover effects of extraction and use of natural resources, the dominance of the natural resources sector in many national economies, and the high degree of price volatility in this class of goods. A variety of statistical data related to natural resources are presented in order to illustrate the magnitude and direction of global trade flows. Enhancing crop yields in the developing countries through restoration of the soil organic carbon pool in agricultural lands. R. Lal; Land Degradation & Development; Pages: ; First Published: 3 .

        Land, energy, and water resources are shared among competing users within prespecified geographical units that form markets, which are linked through trade in energy and agricultural commodities. Allocations of resources are determined by establishing equilibrium prices for all land, energy, and water markets in five‐year time steps. @article{osti_, title = {Environmental impacts of coal mining and utilization}, author = {Chadwick, M.J. and Highton, N.H. and Lindman, N.}, abstractNote = {As coal is considered as a substitute for other fuels, more serious attention is being given to the environmental impacts of the whole coal fuel cycle: mining, transport, storage, combustion and conversion.

        Bougainville’s future economic success must solely depend on an agricultural base. This is well documented in W W Rostow’s ’s book, The 5 Stages of Economic Growth, that emphasises the significance of an agricultural base to kick-start economic growth and development in . Here we 1) report results on the change in impacts to each indicator from oil and gas and wind from pre-development conditions, 2) indicate how the impacts of energy development compare to those in the reference strata and as a function of underlying land-use, 3) report impacts per unit energy consumed by the average American, and 4) estimate.


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Impacts of linear developments, resource extraction, and industry on the agricultural land base by Calvin Webb Download PDF EPUB FB2

Impacts of linear developments, resource extraction, and industry on the agricultural land base. Edmonton, Alta.: Environment Council of Alberta, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Calvin Webb; Environment Council of Alberta.

The book provides a deeper understanding of the dynamics of the human environments where resource extraction takes place and its consequent impacts on local livelihoods. Overlaps with the land base of agriculture are extensive: mining and hydrocarbon concessions cover 38% of total agricultural land use in Perú, and 39% in Ghana.

This is significant given that both countries (especially Perú) face significant constraints in extending the agricultural frontier because of constraints on water resources (Bury et Cited by:   The ecological destruction from the Baghjan gas well blowout is part of the story of Assam’s economic development.

Resource extraction has been foundational to the logic of politics in Assam but has marginalised local ing black clouds against the sky form the background in Baghjan, Assam. Crude oil and gas continue to burn since a devastating gas well Author: Dolly Kikon.

BOX 1: FAO's DEFINITION OF SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT Sustainable development is the management and conservation of the natural resource base and the orientation of technological and institutional change in such a manner as to ensure the attainment and continued satisfaction of human needs for the present and future generations.

Human expansion throughout the world caused that agriculture is a dominant form of land management globally. Human influence on the land is accelerating because of rapid population growth and increasing food requirements.

To stress the interactions between society and the environment, the driving forces (D), pressures (P), states (S), impacts (I), and response (R) (DPSIR) framework. John F. Shroder, in Natural Resources in Afghanistan, In terms of natural resource management and development, the three most essential elements to consider are the land itself upon which an overwhelming number of Afghans depend for their agricultural livelihoods; the water, without which no agriculture is possible; and the mineral and hydrocarbon bonanzas that offer the possibility of.

Continued depletion of the planet’s natural resource stock will have a number of economic and environmental consequences. First, ongoing harvesting of mineral ores, fossil fuel reserves, and agricultural land will tend to place upwards pressure on resource prices, affecting resource access and economic development.

A large proportion of world population growth will take place in coastal zones of developing countries and will be accompanied by rapid urban development and changes in land and resource use.

Increasing urbanization, industrial development, agricultural intensification and expansion of tourism will all have profound effects on natural habitats. those whose adjustment speed is so fast that impacts on the resource in one time period have little or no effects in subsequent periods.

For example, noise pollution and particulates in the air, solar radiation, as well as much agricultural production can be thought of as expendable. ‘Net positive’, from Positive Development (PD) theory, is a new paradigm in sustainable development and design.

PD theory (taught and published from ) was first detailed in Positive Development (). A net positive system/structure would ‘give back to nature and society more than it takes’ over its life cycle. In contrast, ‘sustainable development’ - in the real-world context.

Migration, Natural Resource Extraction and Poverty in North Sulawesi, Indonesia Article (PDF Available) in Human Ecology 33(3) June with Reads How we measure 'reads'. provide the foundations of land resource economics.

These three parts end with a chapter that discusses current developments, new directions, and possibilities for the future. Part Four draws upon both the foundations and new directions to examine current resource management issues that will provide critical challenges in the future.

If conceptualized as a linear production chain—with materials transformation and product flow at the centre of analysis—the oil industry may be divided into six sequential work processes: exploration, extraction/production, refining, distribution, consumption and carbon capture ().We can think of this as a ‘hydrocarbon commodity chain’, the end points of which are rooted in the natural.

The extraction cost of base metals is large and its extraction usually requires intensive investment, the buildup of large infrastructures, and generally produces large environmental impacts (Fig.

As an example, we may quote the 10 biggest iron mines in the world and their environmental impacts. The extraction and development of natural resources, along with natural factors (e.g., insects, wind, floods), The resource development impact ratings contained in this report are based on assessments conducted currently within th e Timber Harvesting Land Base.

impacts of subsistence economic activity on the resource base and to limited quantities of biodegradable wastes.

As economic development accelerates with the intensification of agriculture and other resource extraction and the takeoff of industrialisation, the rates of resource depletion begin to exceed the rates of agricultural land.

The extraction and development of natural resources, along with natural factors (e.g., insects, wind, floods), influence and impact ecological condition.

The goal of effectiveness evaluations is to assess these impacts on the state of public nat ural resource values (status, trends, and causal factors) ; such evaluations do not assess.

ronmental impacts of previous human activities in karst areas and the effects that those impacts have had on the quality of life. Many human activities can negatively impact karst areas, includ-ing deforestation, agricultural practices, urbanization, tourism, military activities, water exploitation, mining, and quarrying (Drew, ) (fi g.

resource base of agriculture, giving farmers economic incentives for conserving that Farming is, at bottom, a resource extraction industry. Both crop and livestock production involve harvesting biota, that is, renewable natural resources produced by incentives to forego development of their land, even when doing so is in the public.

Increased resource efficiency is essential for continued socio-economic progress. The emergence of resource efficiency and the low-carbon economy as European policy priorities is grounded in a recognition that the prevailing model of economic development — based on steadily growing resource use and harmful emissions — cannot be sustained in the long term.The environmental impacts of development projects can create tensions if to the natural resource base of many countries to an average annual expansion of global agricultural land of less.Unlike industry, which has no ecological limits, agricultural activities are subject to the law of diminishing yields, which also applies to mining activities.

“Nature makes its services pay all the more for the higher the demand for them,” François Divisia concluded in his “Rational Economy” inunless, he was told, technological.